how to treat piles by medical therapy

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How to treat piles by medical therapy

How to treat piles by medical therapy
How to treat piles by medical therapy

There are few gastrointestinal problems that people talk about less than hemorrhoids. They are a forbidden item of discussion among friends, even family members. Moreover, yet they can be extremely uncomfortable and, in many cases, treatable only by doctors who are experts in handling these little annoyances.

Are you among those who suffer from hemorrhoids? Statistics show that 50 percent of American adults have hemorrhoids by the age of 50. Only a slight percent of these people attempt to seek treatment for their condition. This amounts to about 10.4 million inhabitants in the US having hemorrhoids and seeking treatment. Also, each year an additional 1 million new cases among Americans develop. About 10-20 percent of all cases eventually need surgery.(see What causes hemorrhoids)

How to treat piles

A large number of local medications, suppositories, and wipes are available to patients. Patients will frequently endeavor self-medication with over-the-counter products before seeking treatment from a physician. Objective evidence regarding the success of these products is dilute. Most available data does not rigorously examine outcomes compared to control or placebo, or make use of standardized definitions and investigate instruments. It is, therefore, inappropriate to make firm recommendations in support of any of the products. The use of these commodities is so simple that surgeons should be familiar with them so that appropriate discussion can be entertained with patients.

How to treat piles without surgery

If self-care measures do not provide relief for your piles, your care provider may prescribe medication or other treatment techniques that can help. In some cases, treatment with a
medicated cream or drug may be necessary. (see How to get rid of hemorrhoids)

Standard over-the-counter products consist ointments, creams, gels, suppositories, foams, and wipes. Most products contain a federation of agents including a barrier protectant and another active ingredient. Local anesthetics practical topically may provide temporary relief of ache, itching, and burning. The delivery vehicles may cause local irritation to the anoderm.

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The active ingredients have benzocaine, benzyl alcohol, dibucaine, dyclonine, lidocaine, pramoxine, and tetracaine.Vasoconstricting agents can be used to reduce swelling and engorgement of hemorrhoids.

Available drugs consist ephedrine, epinephrine, and phenylephrine. Barrier protectants aim to protect skin irritation by keeping mucus, stool, or mucosa from right contacting the perianal skin. Ordinary products include aluminum hydroxide gel, cocoa butter, glycerin, kaolin, lanolin, mineral oil, petrolatum, starch, and zinc oxide.

Astringents can be used to clean and dry the perineum. These products consist calamine, zinc oxide, and witch hazel (See more).

Analgesics aim to sooth the anus. These consist, camphor, juniper tar, and menthol.

Corticosteroids are anti-effervescent drugs. These serve to relieve perianal inflammation, itching, and ache. Prolonged use may cause thinning of the skin and therefore should not be used for longer than a few weeks.

Patients commonly attempt symptomatic relief with suppositories. Suppositories do not remain localized within the anal canal. They are often expelled rapidly after infiltration, in which case they cannot deliver a sustained dose of medication.

Alternatively, they may remove proximally into the rectum, where the therapy will be provided. However, as these treatments are meant to act topically within the anus, they are not affecting the suitable mucosa.

Suppositories may offer indirect benefit by either mechanically stimulating the rectum to evacuate, or they may deliver lubrication to the anal canal and rectum, which can provide some benefit by lubricating the anus, and thus mitigating the results of stool trauma on the hemorrhoids. (See Preparation H Hemorrhoidal Suppository For Hemorrhoids Reviews)

A variety of soothing creams and ointments are contained within the suppositories. Frequently, steroids and topical anesthetics will be combined with these agents. (see Doctor Butler’s Hemorrhoid & Fissure Ointment -hemorrhoid cream review)

How to treat piles naturally at home

  • There are also many home remedies and herbal remedies for hemorrhoids. Herbal remedies often contain the same medicine in it that modern preparations for hemorrhoids have. Witch hazel and horse chestnut are traditional remedies for the treatment of hemorrhoids.
  • Avocado, Tomato, and Arugula Salad provides lots of fiber and has bioflavonoids for good colon health.

Ingredients: 

  • 2 c halved cherry tomatoes
  • 3 c small arugula leaves
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/4 c sun-dried tomatoes, chopped up
  • 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • Two small, peeled and pitted avocadoes, sliced

Directions: Using a plastic bowl, toss cherry tomatoes, arugula, sun-dried tomatoes, olive oil and vinegar. Put onto plates, serving each plate with a few slices of avocado.

To treat piles, your best strategy is to stay regular. And Try raw food diet.

In raw food diet study (iowasource.com) says the raw food diet has helped many people to heal their hemorrhoids.

Raw Food Made Fun, Easy & Beautiful
Raw Food Made Fun, Easy & Beautiful

“Reverend George Malkmus of the Hallelujah Food (which is 85% raw food) says the diet cleared up his hemorrhoids.”

In my opinion, Hemorrhoids are caused by straining to push out stools. With a raw diet, you should reduce easier and therefore have less straining, so it should give them a chance to heal.

You can have the recipes handy To help you out, Raw Food Made Fun, Easy & Beautiful Book is a list of recipes for dishes you can make that are healthy for your hemorrhoids. For recipe on avoiding piles,  See morestyle=

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